Networks in the News

Large teams develop and small teams disrupt science and technology

A research article by Lingfei Wu, Dashun Wang, and James A. Evans. One of the most universal trends in science and technology today is the growth of large teams in all areas, as solitary researchers and small teams diminish in prevalence. Increases in team size have been attributed to the specialization of scientific activities3,... read more »

 

Networks in the News – The Determinants of Sharing Strategy in a Wi-Fi Sharing Game

A new study by the Human Nature Lab at Yale University explored how people allocate a limited, but personally usable, resource (e.g., unused Wi-Fi bandwidth) to their neighbors. Based on results from a Wi-Fi sharing game that the authors developed, the study found that (a) network density (i.e., the extent which people... read more »

 

Fake news on Twitter during the 2016 U.S. presidential election

Paper by Nir Grinberg, Kenneth Joseph, Lisa Friedland, Briony Swire-Thompson, and David Lazer The spread of fake news on social media became a public concern in the United States after the 2016 presidential election. We examined exposure to and sharing of fake news by registered voters on Twitter and found that engagement... read more »

 

Betweenness to assess leaders in criminal networks: New evidence using the dual projection approach

A recent article “Betweenness to assess leaders in criminal networks: New evidence using the dual projection approach” by Rosanna Grassi, Francesco Calderoni, and Monica Bianchi show the performance of different betweenness centrality measures in identifying criminal leaders in a meeting participation network.... read more »

 

How algorithmic popularity bias hinders or promotes quality

By Giovanni Luca Ciampaglia, Azadeh Nematzadeh, Filippo Menczer & Alessandro Flammini Algorithms that favor popular items are used to help us select among many choices, from top-ranked search engine results to highly-cited scientific papers. The goal of these algorithms is to identify high-quality items such as... read more »

 

Complexity Explorables by Dirk Brockmann

Complexity Explorables is a website where people easily explore some complex systems examples while playing models with fun. For example, “I herd you!” enables you to explore how different network structures impact the spread of a disease in a population. Consequently, you can understand a phenomenon called “herd... read more »

 

Multidimensional Understanding of Tie Strength

An article “The weakness of tie strength” in the current issue of Social Networks unpacked three elements related to the strength of ties: capacity, frequency, and redundancy. The case with an email network shows that the three elements are not highly correlated and are likely to reflect different dimensions of ties.... read more »

 

Using networks to analyze soccer

Engineering professor Luís Amaral has investigated complex social and structural networks in areas ranging from healthcare and biology to gender discrimination and gun violence. His diverse research interests and innate curiosity eventually led him to study soccer — his favorite sport. https://news.northwestern.edu/stories/2018/may/using-big-data-to-analyze-soccer/  read more »

 

Social Media for Opioid Addiction Epidemiology: Automatic Detection of Opioid Addicts from Twitter and Case Studies

A recent research from West Virginia University shows how to detect opioid addicted people from large structured heterogeneous networks using transductive learning. Check out the paper: https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3132857  read more »

 

How network theory predicts the value of Bitcoin

A recent research by Spencer Wheatley at ETH Zurich in Switzerland and a few colleagues shows that the key measure of value for cryptocurrencies is the network of people who use them. What’s more, they say, once Bitcoin is valued in this way it becomes possible to see when it is overvalued and perhaps even to spot the... read more »